2015 Plantation Tour of Georgetown

Outdoor pool at Harrietta Plantation overlooking the scenic South Santee River.

Outdoor pool at Harrietta Plantation overlooking the scenic South Santee River.

View of Harrietta Plantation from outdoor pool area.

View of Harrietta Plantation from outdoor pool area.

Garden side of Harrietta Plantation

Garden side of Harrietta Plantation

View of South Santee River from the garden side of Harrietta Plantation

View of South Santee River from the garden side of Harrietta Plantation

Entrance side of Harrietta Plantation, built over a 6 year period , from 1791 to 1797 by the Horry's of nearby Hampton Plantation, for their daughter Harrietta and her new husband Frederick Rutledge. Currently owned by 5-Hour Energy drink founder who has never lived there.

Entrance side of Harrietta Plantation, built over a 6 year period , from 1791 to 1797 by the Horry’s of nearby Hampton Plantation, for their daughter Harrietta and her new husband Frederick Rutledge. Currently owned by 5-Hour Energy drink founder who has never lived there.

Harrietta Plantation

Harrietta Plantation

Several gators were floating in this lake at Harrietta Plantation.

Several gators were floating in this lake at Harrietta Plantation.

Entrance to The Oaks Plantation.

Entrance to The Oaks Plantation.

Working barn at The Oaks Plantation.

Working barn at The Oaks Plantation.

Millbrook Plantation, now called Annandale Plantation, was built in 1791 and is one of South Carolina's finest remaining examples of the rice plantation era. During the 1850's it was one of the most prosperous, producing 900,000 lbs. of rice each year with the work of 230 slaves.

Millbrook Plantation, now called Annandale Plantation, was built in 1791 and is one of South Carolina’s finest remaining examples of the rice plantation era. During the 1850’s it was one of the most prosperous, producing 900,000 lbs. of rice each year with the work of 230 slaves.

Millbrook Plantation (Annandale Plantation)

Millbrook Plantation (Annandale Plantation)

Millbrook Plantation has two front doors. The one to the right opens to the gentleman's parlor while the one on the left opens to the (larger) ladies parlor. Each parlor has its own fireplace.  Originally, there was a solid wall between the parlors, but at some point the wall was replaced by two very large, sliding pocket doors.

Millbrook Plantation has two front doors. The one to the right opens to the gentleman’s parlor while the one on the left opens to the (larger) ladies parlor. Each parlor has its own fireplace. Originally, there was a solid wall between the parlors, but at some point the wall was replaced by two very large, sliding pocket doors.

Side view of Estherville Plantation which faces Winyah Bay with Minim Creek to the rear. Originally 12,000 acres, Estherville was granted in 1711 to Landgrave Robert Daniel. A portion of this land came into the hands of Archibald Johnstone who married Esther Allston after whom the place is named. In 1850, their great grandson planted Estherville and in that year they harvested 300,000 pounds of rice with the work of 90 slaves.

Side view of Estherville Plantation which faces Winyah Bay with Minim Creek to the rear. Originally 12,000 acres, Estherville was granted in 1711 to Landgrave Robert Daniel. A portion of this land came into the hands of Archibald Johnstone who married Esther Allston after whom the place is named. In 1850, their great grandson planted Estherville and in that year they harvested 300,000 pounds of rice with the work of 90 slaves.

Cannon located at Battery White, facing Winyah Bay. Named by Revolutionary War officer General Peter Horry in 1801, it contains 640 acres. In 1862, upon the authorization of the Confederate Army officers, the niece of Horry authorized the construction of earthworks fitted with massive Columbiad cannons to defend the port of Georgetown. Union forces captured the port in 1865 led by Admiral Dahlgren. Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt and Bernard Baruch all visited the area.

Cannon located at Battery White, facing Winyah Bay. Named by Revolutionary War officer General Peter Horry in 1801, it contains 640 acres. In 1862, upon the authorization of the Confederate Army officers, the niece of Horry authorized the construction of earthworks fitted with massive Columbiad cannons to defend the port of Georgetown. Union forces captured the port in 1865 led by Admiral Dahlgren. Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt and Bernard Baruch all visited the area.

Columbiad cannon installed by the Confederate Army is still aimed at Winyah Bay

Columbiad cannon installed by the Confederate Army is still aimed at Winyah Bay